Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13
and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this conflict has gone, the worse it has gotten. all of those who argued for non intervention because of the things tha
senator mark warner on his plan to allow more highly-skilled immigrants into the u.s. at 8 eastern on c-span2, the president and incoming ceo of the nation's second biggest provider of medicare health plans, and at 8 eastern on c-span3, a discussion on scientific predictions about the future and the impact they have on public policy. .. but i think that there's no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. but it is something -- there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, we look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany. saturday at noon eastern on booktv own c-span2, and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> now, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined bay former obama administration at visor on iran who discusses iran's program. the foundation for the defense of democracies held this event. >> good morning. it's a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. very quickly
on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, and that if we allow regions of our fellow citizens to stay unemployed for year or two years or longer, we know from
passed in may but it's an important support program to make sure that the most vulnerable among us are cared for and they can bounce back up. it's one of those programs where we try to reach out, mr. speaker, not to prop folks up but to give them a hand up so that they can succeed. . these programs face a 35% cut. why is that? in the two years you and i have been here, mr. speaker, we have seen discretionary spending, it started in 2010 at some of the highest levels in american history. you and i in a bipartisan way brought it down in 2011. we brought it down again in 2012. and we brought it down again for f.y. 2013. i open up those newspapers, mr. speaker, folks talk about how there is no agreement here. folks are arguing and fighting with each other. in a bipartisan way this house, that senate, and our president has seen discretionary spending drop three years in a row. never before in my lifetime have we seen such a thing. i credit this body with being a driving force in that because we were elected by the american people who want to see their fiscal bucks put back in order, but
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
the best. don't be a stranger. we are counting on you to continue to inspire us and may god go with you. >> i'd like to now recognize the representative from northern missouri, mr. graves. mr. graves: thank you very much. mr. speaker, i rise to recognize the distinguished service of my neighbor to the north, congressman leonard boswell. and was just pointed out, he was born in missouri's sixth congressional district which is the district i represent in harrison county. that's a fact that's probably dogged him throughout his career in iowa politics. we are very happy to have him actually born there. i got to know leonard through his hard work on matters related to aviation. and as has been pointed out today, leonard is a former military helicopter pilot but he later got his fixed rns and most recently been flying a comanche and zoneth. he's been a great a -- zenith. he's been a great advocate for aviation. i have worked on countless pieces of legislation to advance the interests of aviation. in the f.a.a. re-authorization which we just finished this year, parts of last year, there was im
against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the january 1 deadline before and get 30-day extensions. at some point they were working without an extension. medicare told doctors to hold off on submitting your claims for a little bit. that is a situation we have ended up in before. if we're talking months, we're talking about big pay cuts for medicare doctors. that would be uncharted territory. host: joe from arizona on the republican line. caller: good morning. if we look at it logically, sarah is on the right track. we have become a society with honesty as a technicality. you can get more money but you break the law. our society -- you need to stop your people on the show, politicians and say, i asked you a question and you didn't answer it. this is why the doctors in medicar
it is the gas tax that goes to building roads and highways that people use every day but not realizing that they are paying for that. a variety of other things that people use that the tax system paid for but not realizing that connection. so the whole idea you bring up, stephen, that you believe that -- to connect the taxes they are paying with what they are getting in some respects, i agree with you and that is one of the challenges. on the first point, i take exception to you saying that my request for raising the cap on social security is a knee-jerk reaction. knee-jerk reaction is a description of somebody just sort of making a decision without thinking about it. i have put a lot of thought on the issue. you and i may disagree on the best solution but i put a lot of thought into it and i think it is the best solution. it may be a solution i am not successful at achieving in terms of a final deal. but if you want to look at the long-term solvency of social security, it is a great way to address it. >> -- host: just a few thoughts, first from our facebook page from a viewer. guest:
it is and what we do. everyone here is familiar with us. the work we are going to be presenting comes from a report that will be released during the hearing, during the presentation. gao-13-74, older americans act, to improve target and to meet equity. the older americans act was passed, to buy services to older adults and help them remain in their homes and communities, and provides very important services. title 3, provides support services like transportation and home delivered meals. title 3 provides care giver support. and the title 7, it provides protection activities to protect the rights of all vulnerable elderly people. in fiscal 2012, the title three had about $1.36 billion. title 7, $22 million. obviously, with the fiscal cliff discussions, these are sort of rounding errors. but as i am sure you all know, these are services the targeted community depends heavily on. and we know america is aging. america is getting older every day. i think 10,000 people retire every day. by 2030 is as -- it is estimated 20% of the population will be aged 65 and over. this really targets services
, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. someone is going to have to move. the question is, who? the president met with senate majority leader harry reid before going to hawaii and his offer was to extend the tax cuts for incomes under $250,000, extend unemployment insurance benefits, and the lady across -- and then delay the across the board automatic cuts that are supposed to start january 1. that seems to be a non starter with republicans. it's hard to see where we go from here. host: have they been talking over the christmas break at all? also, one has been the role of -- what has been the role of senator mitch mcconnell? guest: the line that comes from the speakers office all the time is the line of communication remain open. i don't know how much talking they did as the president was in hawaii spending time with his family and the speaker was back home in ohio, i believe. i don't know that for sure. everyone was doing their family time and not really working that significantly on something. i think there was probably some minimal conversation, but no
with everyone in our country paying his or her fair share. so this rule today that says give us authority to have other bills brought to the floor, well, one of those bills is the middle income tax cut, we are happy with that. but if that isn't the plan, then i urge my colleagues to vote no on the previous question because that will then enable us to bring a rule to the floor which calls for bringing forth the middle income tax cut before we leave here. again, we support the president and his proposal, which is fair, which reduces the deficit, which creates jobs, and which will work for the american people. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. gentleman from texas. mr. session: thank you very much, mr. speaker. with great respect to my dear friend, the gentlewoman from san francisco, and the minority leader, i'm delighted that she came down to engage us on this very important issue. the gentlewoman does recognize and know that the house on august 1, in fact, did exactly what she has suggested that they, and that is to t
of instability. and all three governments reiterated to us their shared goals -- their share gold -- shared goals. all three indicated to was that the most abusive commanders are now under targeted sanctions and we have placed those same individuals under u.s. sanctions. talks between the garcia government and the environment -- m 23 began on december 29 in uganda and are being mediated with uganda as the chair on the international conference of the great lakes region known as the i c g lra. as the two sides begin substantive con -- talks, the current cease-fire is holding and the parties continue to express commitment to a dialogue. much of the m-23's military success and prowess and would not have been possible without outside support. there's a credit to ballpark -- body of evidence that corroborates the assertions of the u.n. experts that the rwanda government provided significant military and political support to the end-23. while there is evidence of uganda providing support to and- 23, we do not have a body of evidence suggesting that the ugandan government as a policy supported the m-23.
. >> can you explain to us which group is your largest supporter and which groups you won't and what your reasoning is? >> tomorrow, depp ste -- deputy secretary of state burns will attend the friends of syrian people meeting in morocco. we'll do all we can to broaden support of the syrian coalition and work with like-minded countries to bring this crisis to an end. we're pleased with their continued efforts to organize, corm technical -- form technical committees and take concrete steps to form a union fid, just, democratic future for syria. these are in line with what we and our international partners would result from the formation of the commission last month. as we look at ongoing efforts to support the syrian people, let me be clear 24e678 united states stands with the syrian people in insist that can any transition process result in a peaceful, unified, democratic syria in which all citizens are protected and a future of this kind cannot inlewd al-assad. >> [inaudible] >> that's correct. we provide significant assistance to the syrian people, we proside significant, not lethal, ass
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13